What is a entropion?

Entropion is usually an inherited condition in dogs where the eyelids are misshapen and turn inward to rub on the cornea. Increased tearing and chronic conjunctivitis develop in mild forms of the condition. In severe cases, the hairs on the eyelids rub on the cornea and cause ulcers (scratches) to develop. If the condition in not addressed, the ulcers may become infected or not heal and could result in permanent scarring of the cornea and loss of vision. The treatment for entropion is surgical and involves altering the eyelids to restore a more normal anatomical position. Depending on the severity of entropion, some patients may need more than one surgical procedure to fully correct the problem.

When entropion develops in puppies under 4 months of age, a permanent surgery is not usually the best treatment option. As puppies grow, the severity of the entropion may significantly lessen or they may not need a surgical procedure at all. In young puppies, the recommended treatment is a temporary tacking of the eyelids (for three to six weeks) to prevent them from rolling inward. The temporary tacking will sometimes prevent the need for a permanent surgical procedure in the future or minimize the surgical correction necessary to resolve the entropion. Once the puppy is fully grown (8 to 12 months), we would re-evaluate the need for surgery and make recommendations at that time.

Entropion, rolling eyelids, cat, dog, surgery, cornea, conjunctiva, ulcer, pain, discharge

Entropion in both eyes in a cat

Entropion, rolling eyelids, cat, dog, surgery, cornea, conjunctiva, ulcer, pain, discharge

Details of entropion in the same cat (right eye)

Entropion, rolling eyelids, cat, dog, surgery, cornea, conjunctiva, ulcer, pain, discharge

Same right eye just after surgery

Entropion, rolling eyelids, cat, dog, surgery, cornea, conjunctiva, ulcer, pain, discharge

Same cat 2 week after surgery