Eosinophilic keratitis is a condition in which the cornea (the clear front part of the eye) becomes infiltrated with eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) and other types of inflammatory cells. The cause of the eosinophilic keratitis is often multifactorial, but in many cases feline herpesvirus infection is the underlying cause. Occasionally, the immune-system of the eye surface is over-stimulated for an unknown reason, which also results in this condition. Many conditions caused by feline herpesvirus can be chronic and recurrent.

Treatment includes topical ant-inflammatory medications such as cortisone (steroids) or cyclosporine. Topical anti-viral medications are also often prescribed. Injectable cortisone may be recommended for severely affected eyes. Complete resolution of signs can take a few weeks. Medications are reduced slowly over a period of several more weeks to minimize the risk of recurrence. However, recurrence does occur in some patients and low frequency, maintenance treatment may be warranted in order to maintain comfort and vision long term

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A cat with Eosinophilic keratitis.  The same eye after 4 weeks after treatment.

 

Eosinophilic keratitis, cornea, inflammatory, Eosinophilic keratitis, inflammation, cat, horse, immune, allergy, Feline herpes virus

Another cat with the same disease and the same eye 8 weeks later